Mercedes-Benz in Formula One


Mercedes-Benz in Formula One

Mercedes-Benz are currently involved in Formula One, running the Mercedes AMG Petronas Formula One Team, a GermanFormula One racing team, based in Brackley, United Kingdom, using a German licence. Mercedes-Benz had competed in the pre-warEuropean Championship winning three titles, and debuted in Formula One in 1954, running a team for two years.

After winning their first race at the 1954 French Grand Prix, driver Juan Manuel Fangio won another three grands prix to win the 1954 drivers championship, and repeated this success in 1955 when he won Mercedes’ second title. Despite winning two championships Mercedes-Benz withdrew from motor racing as a response to the 1955 Le Mans disaster, and did not return until rejoining as an engine supplier in association with Ilmor.

Mercedes-Benz returned as an engine supplier in 1994 in a partnership with Ilmor, now called Mercedes AMG High Performance Powertrains. It supplied Sauber for one season, then switched to McLaren in 1995. In 2009 they also became suppliers of Brawn GPand Force India. Mercedes returned with a factory team in 2010 after the purchase of Brawn. A fourth team was added to the supplying program in 2014, Williams.

The manufacturer has collected over 100 wins as engine supplier, and is ranked fourth in Formula One history. Two constructors and four drivers championships have been won with Mercedes-Benz engines.

Mercedes-Benz formerly competed in Grand Prix motor racing in the 1930s, when the Silver Arrows dominated alongside rivals Auto Union. Both teams were heavily funded by the Nazi regime, winning all European Grand Prix Championships after 1932, of whichRudolf Caracciola won three for Mercedes-Benz.

In 1954, Mercedes-Benz returned to what was now known as Formula One (a World Championship having been established in 1950), using the technologically advanced Mercedes-Benz W196. The car was run in both the conventional open-wheeled configuration and a streamlined form, which featured covered wheels and wider bodywork. Juan Manuel Fangio, the 1951 champion, transferred mid-season from Maserati to Mercedes-Benz for their debut at theFrench Grand Prix on 4 July 1954. The team had immediate success and recorded a 1–2 victory with Fangio and Karl Kling, as well as the fastest lap (Hans Herrmann). Fangio went on to win three more races in 1954, winning the Championship.

The success continued into the 1955 season, with Mercedes developing the W196 throughout the year. Mercedes again dominated the season, with Fangio taking four races, and his new team mate Stirling Moss winning the British Grand Prix. Fangio and Moss finished first and second in that year’s championship. The disaster at the 24 Hours of Le Mans on 11 June which killed Mercedes sportscar driver Pierre Levegh and over 80 spectators led to the cancellations of the French, German, Spanish and Swiss Grands Prix. The team withdrew from motor sport, including Formula One, at the end of the season.

 

Read more at Wikipedia


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